Frequent question: What is intermediate prostate cancer?

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Is intermediate prostate cancer serious?

Overall survival rates for the low-risk and favorable intermediate-risk groups were 91.4 and 93.7 percent at seven years following treatment. In the unfavorable intermediate-risk group, the most aggressive form of cancer in this study, overall survival was 86.5 percent at seven years. Severe toxicities were rare.

How fast does intermediate prostate cancer spread?

The median time to metastasis was 8.9 years, meaning that for all the men whose cancer spread, half experienced it within 8.9 years of diagnosis and half experienced it later than that.

How long can you live with intermediate prostate cancer?

Over 90% of patients with low-risk, and over 75% of those with intermediate risk prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy will survive greater than 10 years after surgery alone.

What is the best treatment for unfavorable intermediate risk prostate cancer?

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is beneficial for unfavorable intermediate-risk (IR) prostate cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy (RT). However, for favorable IR patients the latest NCCN guidelines recommends RT alone.

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Can you live 20 years with prostate cancer?

Men with Gleason 7 and 8 to 10 tumors were found to be at high risk of dying from prostate cancer. After 20 years, only 3 of 217 patients survived. Men with moderate-grade disease have intermediate cumulative risk of prostate cancer progression after 20 years of follow-up.

How long can a man live with prostate cancer without treatment?

Almost 100% of men who have early-stage prostate cancer will survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. Men with advanced prostate cancer or whose cancer has spread to other regions have lesser survival rates. About one-third will survive for 5 years after diagnosis.

Can you live 10 years with metastatic prostate cancer?

Of the 794 evaluable patients, 77% lived < 5 years, 16% lived 5 up to 10 years, and 7% lived > or = 10 years. Factors predicting a statistical significant association with longer survival (P < 0.05) included minimal disease, better PS, no bone pain, lower Gleason score, and lower PSA level.

Can prostate cancer be completely cured?

The short answer is yes, prostate cancer can be cured, when detected and treated early. The vast majority of prostate cancer cases (more than 90 percent) are discovered in the early stages, making the tumors more likely to respond to treatment. Treatment doesn’t always have to mean surgery or chemotherapy, either.

Is Stage 4 prostate cancer a death sentence?

Stage 4 cancer, also known as metastatic cancer, is the most advanced stage. It is the least likely to be cured and is unlikely to end up in remission. That doesn’t mean it’s automatically a death sentence—many stage 4 cancer patients live for many years—but the prognosis is not likely to be good.

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Can a woman get cancer from a man who has prostate cancer?

Some might worry that they have a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but prostate cancer is not an STI, and a person cannot pass it to another person through sex or by any other means.

Does prostate cancer reduce life expectancy?

Almost 100% of men who have local or regional prostate cancer will survive more than five years after diagnosis. Fewer men (about 7 %) have more advanced prostate cancer at the time of diagnosis. Once prostate cancer has spread beyond the prostate, survival rates fall.

What are the four stages of prostate cancer?

Prostate cancer stages range from 1 through 4.

  • Stage 1 means the cancer is on one side of the prostate. …
  • Stage 2 means the cancer remains confined to the prostate gland. …
  • Stage 3 means the cancer is locally advanced. …
  • Stage 4 means the cancer has spread to lymph nodes or to other parts of the body.

What is the best treatment for prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 7?

Background: Optimal therapy for Gleason score 7 (GS7) prostate cancer (PC) remains to be defined, with consensus guidelines identifying both prostatectomy (RP) and radiation therapy (RT) as acceptable.