How is carcinoma in situ treated?

Is carcinoma in situ really cancer?

In general, carcinoma in situ is the earliest form of cancer, and is considered stage 0. An example of carcinoma in situ is ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, which is considered an early form of breast cancer and occurs when abnormal cells form a breast’s milk duct.

Should situ carcinoma be treated?

DCIS can’t spread outside the breast, but it still needs to be treated because it can sometimes go on to become invasive breast cancer (which can spread). In most cases, a woman with DCIS can choose between breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and simple mastectomy. But sometimes a mastectomy might be a better option.

Should situ carcinoma be left untreated?

Why should DCIS be treated? The cells in DCIS are cancer cells. If left untreated, they may spread out of the milk duct into the breast tissue. If this happens, DCIS has become invasive (or infiltrating) cancer, which in turn can spread to lymph nodes or to other parts of the body.

Is carcinoma in situ reversible?

Precancer progresses through dysplastic phases to carcinoma in situ and these changes can be documented by aneuploidy in the abnormal cells. Some of all these degrees of dysplasia, including carcinoma in situ, have been shown to be reversible.

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What are the symptoms of carcinoma in situ?

When ductal carcinoma in situ does produce symptoms, the most common include:

  • Breast pain.
  • Bloody discharge from the nipple.
  • A palpable lump in the breast tissue.
  • A red, scaly rash known as Paget’s disease of the breast.

How fast does ductal carcinoma in situ grow?

It assumes that all breast carcinomas begin as DCIS and take 9 years to go from a single cell to an invasive lesion for the slowest growing lesions, 6 years for intermediate growing DCIS lesions, and 3 years for fast-growing DCIS lesions.

How often does DCIS come back?

Most recurrences happen within the 5 to 10 years after initial diagnosis. The chances of a recurrence are under 30%. Women who have breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) for DCIS without radiation therapy have about a 25% to 30% chance of having a recurrence at some point in the future.