Question: Why is skin cancer increasing in Australia?

Is skin cancer increasing in Australia?

Skin cancer is a major cause of illness in Australia

The age-standardised incidence rate of melanoma has increased from 27 cases per 100,000 in 1982 to 49 per 100,000 in 2016.

Why is the rate of skin cancer increasing?

The increase in the incidence of skin cancer can be mainly attributed to the use of artificial sunlamps and intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light (Bologniaetal.,2012).

Who is most at risk of skin cancer in Australia?

The risk is higher in men than in women (70% vs. 58% cumulative risk of NMSC before age 70 1; 58.5 vs. 39.0 age-standardised incidence rate of melanoma2). The risk of mortality is also higher for men – 69% of Australians who die from skin cancer are men.

What is the most common cancer in Australia?

The most common cancers in Australia (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) are prostate, breast, colorectal (bowel), melanoma and lung cancer. These five cancers account for about 60% of all cancers diagnosed in Australia.

How can you tell if a spot is cancerous?

Redness or new swelling beyond the border of a mole. Color that spreads from the border of a spot into surrounding skin. Itching, pain, or tenderness in an area that doesn’t go away or goes away then comes back. Changes in the surface of a mole: oozing, scaliness, bleeding, or the appearance of a lump or bump.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  What does infiltrative basal cell carcinoma mean?

Who is most at risk for skin cancer?

What Are the Risk Factors for Skin Cancer?

  • A lighter natural skin color.
  • Skin that burns, freckles, reddens easily, or becomes painful in the sun.
  • Blue or green eyes.
  • Blond or red hair.
  • Certain types and a large number of moles.
  • A family history of skin cancer.
  • A personal history of skin cancer.
  • Older age.

Who gets skin cancer the most?

Skin cancer

  • Skin cancer can affect anyone, regardless of skin color. …
  • Skin cancer rates are higher in women than in men before age 50, but are higher in men after age 50, which may be related to differences in recreation and work-related UV exposure. …
  • Melanoma is the second most common form of cancer in females age 15-29.

Why is there so much cancer in Australia?

The increase in number of new cases and deaths for all cancers combined as reported (Figures 1,2) are largely due to the growth in size and ageing of the Australian population.