What are the chances of getting secondary breast cancer?

What are the chances of getting secondary cancer after breast cancer?

One to three percent of survivors develop a second cancer different from the originally treated cancer. The level of risk is small, and greater numbers of survivors are living longer due to improvements in treatment.

Can you survive secondary breast cancer?

Secondary breast cancer can be controlled, often for many years, but it cannot be cured. Because of new and improved treatments, women with secondary breast cancer are living for longer. The aim of treatment is to control the cancer, improve the symptoms and help you to live well for longer.

How common is a second breast cancer?

We calculated rates per 1,000 women years of recurrences and second breast primaries relative to demographics, risk factors, and characteristics of initial diagnosis: stage, treatment, mode of initial diagnosis. Nearly 4% had a second breast cancer event (314 recurrences and 344 second breast primaries).

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Best answer: Is insulin associated with cancer?

What are the chances of breast cancer coming back in the other breast?

For women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, the chance of a contralateral breast cancer, or cancer in the opposite breast to the original cancer, 10 years after diagnosis of the first cancer is about 10-30 percent compared to about 5-10 percent for women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 …

What type of breast cancer is most likely to recur?

Among patients who were recurrence-free when they stopped endocrine therapy after five years, the highest risk of recurrence was for those with originally large tumors and cancer that had spread to four or more lymph nodes. These women had a 40 percent risk of a distant cancer recurrence over the next 15 years.

Can you live 20 years after breast cancer?

Since the hazard rate associated with inflammatory breast cancer shows a sharp peak within the first 2 years and a rapid reduction in risk in subsequent years, it is highly likely that the great majority of patients alive 20 years after diagnosis are cured.

Can I live 10 years with metastatic breast cancer?

While there is no cure for metastatic breast cancer, there are treatments that slow the cancer, extending the patient’s life while also improving the quality of life, Henry says. Many patients now live 10 years or more after a metastatic diagnosis.

Is breast cancer worse the second time?

Even if the original breast cancer doesn’t come back, your risk of developing a new, second breast cancer in the same or opposite breast is much higher than average. Sticking to an aggressive screening plan is the best way to make sure that any breast cancer is diagnosed early, when it’s most treatable.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  How long does it take for melanoma to become invasive?

Can cancer go from one breast to the other?

Breast cancer can happen in both breasts simultaneously or at separate times, and it can also be a clone of the original cancer (metastatic) or it can be a separate primary tumour altogether.

What are the chances of getting cancer a second time?

If you are a cancer survivor, you probably watch for recurrence. A recurrence is the same type you had before, even if it develops in a different area of the body. Second cancers are not uncommon. About 1 in every 6 people diagnosed with cancer has had a different type of cancer in the past.

What are the chances of Stage 1 breast cancer returning?

According to the Susan G. Komen® organization, women with early breast cancer most often develop local recurrence within the first five years after treatment. On average, 7 percent to 11 percent of women with early breast cancer experience a local recurrence during this time.

How long does it take for breast cancer to return?

In most cases, it doesn’t come back, but it can’t be ruled out. If there’s a recurrence, breast cancer is most likely to come back within the first 2 years after you’ve finished treatment. So it’s especially important to pay attention to your health and well-being particularly during this time.