What is the treatment for precancerous colon polyps?

What happens if you have precancerous polyps?

Polyps are not cancerous, but they can be precancerous. This means they will eventually develop into cancer. This process is usually very slow, occurring over 10 to 15 years. The most common form of colon cancer—adenocarcinoma—begins as a precancerous or adenomatous polyp.

How are precancerous polyps treated?

Treatments may include:

  1. removal of polyps (polypectomy)
  2. bowel resection with removal of all of the colon (total colectomy)
  3. bowel resection with removal of the rectum and part of the sigmoid colon (proctocolectomy)

Does a precancerous polyp mean cancer?

It is considered an abnormal growth, but in many cases, they are found to be benign (commonly in the early stages). However, over time polyps can become large and malignant if they aren’t treated. Many polyps are found to be pre-cancerous, which means they have the potential to turn cancerous if they aren’t removed.

How often should you have a colonoscopy if precancerous polyps are found?

If your doctor finds one or two polyps less than 0.4 inch (1 centimeter) in diameter, he or she may recommend a repeat colonoscopy in five to 10 years, depending on your other risk factors for colon cancer. Your doctor will recommend another colonoscopy sooner if you have: More than two polyps.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  What happens when cancer spreads to your thyroid?

How do you prevent precancerous colon polyps?

How Can I Prevent Colon Polyps?

  1. Eat a diet with lots of fruits, vegetables, and fiber-rich foods like beans, lentils, peas, and high-fiber cereal.
  2. Lose weight if you’re overweight.
  3. Limit red meat, processed meats, and foods that are high in fat.

How long does it take for colon to heal after polyp removal?

Recovery from a polypectomy usually takes about 2 weeks. Patients may feel pain following the procedure, particularly immediately after the procedure. Taking the pain medication the doctor prescribes can help.

What exactly does precancerous mean?

Pre-cancer means there are cells that have grown abnormally, causing their size, shape or appearance to look different than normal cells.” Whether abnormal cells become cancerous is, in many cases, an uncertainty. Some of the variables are known, others are not.

Do polyps grow back?

Can polyps come back? If a polyp is removed completely, it is unusual for it to return in the same place. The same factors that caused it to grow in the first place, however, could cause polyp growth at another location in the colon or rectum.

What happens if polyps are not removed?

The most common are hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps. Hyperplastic polyps do not have the potential to become cancerous. However, some adenomatous polyps can turn into cancer if not removed. Patients with adenomatous polyps have an increased chance of developing more polyps.

What percentage of colon polyps are malignant?

Polyps are common in American adults, and while many colon polyps are harmless, over time, some polyps could develop into colon cancer. While the majority of colon cancers start as polyps, only 5-10% of all polyps will become cancerous.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Can you beat aggressive lung cancer?

How long does it take for colon cancer to get to stage 4?

Colon cancer, or cancer that begins in the lower part of the digestive tract, usually forms from a collection of benign (noncancerous) cells called an adenomatous polyp. Most of these polyps will not become malignant (cancerous), but some can slowly turn into cancer over the course of about 10-15 years.

Does the size of a polyp indicate cancer?

The size of the polyp correlates with the development of cancer. Polyps less than 1 centimeter in size have a slightly greater than a 1% chance of becoming cancer, but those 2 centimeters or greater have a 40% chance of transforming into cancer.

What type of polyps are precancerous?

The precancerous polyp which can turn into a cancer is called an adenoma. The two most common types of colorectal polyps are hyperplastic polyps and adenomas.