Best answer: What is recurrent gastric cancer?

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What does recurrent mean in cancer?

(ree-KER-ents) Cancer that has recurred (come back), usually after a period of time during which the cancer could not be detected. The cancer may come back to the same place as the original (primary) tumor or to another place in the body. Also called recurrent cancer.

What happens when stomach cancer returns?

For some people, stomach cancer does come back after treatment, which is known as a recurrence. If the cancer returns, you may have further treatment, including chemotherapy, radiation therapy or surgery. Sometimes people have palliative treatment to ease symptoms.

Can you completely recover from stomach cancer?

Recovery time

Most people will need a high level of care. You can expect to spend time in the high dependency unit or intensive care unit before moving to a standard ward. You will probably be in hospital for 5–10 days, but it can take 3–6 months to fully recover from a gastrectomy.

Can you recover from stomach cancer?

Many cases of stomach cancer can’t be completely cured, but it’s still possible to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life using chemotherapy and in some cases radiotherapy and surgery. If operable, surgery can cure stomach cancer as long as all of the cancerous tissue can be removed.

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Which cancer has highest recurrence rate?

Some cancers are difficult to treat and have high rates of recurrence. Glioblastoma, for example, recurs in nearly all patients, despite treatment. The rate of recurrence among patients with ovarian cancer is also high at 85%.

Related Articles.

Cancer Type Recurrence Rate
Glioblastoma2 Nearly 100%

Is cancer worse the second time?

Doctors can’t predict if your specific cancer will recur. But they do know cancers are more likely to come back if they grow fast or are advanced. The treatment you originally had may also affect your chances of recurrence. Some types of cancer are more likely to come back than others.

Is recurrent cancer more aggressive?

Cancer recurrence may seem even more unfair then. Worse, it’s often more aggressive in the younger cancer survivor – it may grow and spread faster. This aggressiveness means that it could come back earlier and be harder to treat.

What are the symptoms of the final stages of stomach cancer?

In more advanced stages of gastric cancer, the following signs and symptoms may occur:

  • Blood in the stool.
  • Vomiting.
  • Weight loss for no known reason.
  • Stomach pain.
  • Jaundice (yellowing of eyes and skin).
  • Ascites (build-up of fluid in the abdomen).
  • Trouble swallowing.

Where Does stomach cancer usually metastasize to?

This type of cancer is most likely to spread to the liver or peritoneum, which is the membrane lining of the abdominal cavity. Other areas where stomach cancer commonly spreads include the lungs and bones.

Does stomach cancer spread quickly?

Stomach cancer is a slow-growing cancer that usually develops over a year or longer. Generally, there are no symptoms in the early stages (asymptomatic). As the disease progresses, a variety of symptoms can develop.

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What are the signs of cancer returning?

A distant (metastatic) recurrence means the cancer has traveled to distant parts of the body, most commonly the bones, liver and lungs. Signs and symptoms include: Persistent and worsening pain, such as chest, back or hip pain. Persistent cough.

Is recurrent cancer curable?

Can cancer recurrences be treated? In many cases, local and regional recurrences can be cured. Even when a cure isn’t possible, treatment may shrink your cancer to slow the cancer’s growth. This can relieve pain and other symptoms, and it may help you live longer.

What are the chances of getting cancer a second time?

If you are a cancer survivor, you probably watch for recurrence. A recurrence is the same type you had before, even if it develops in a different area of the body. Second cancers are not uncommon. About 1 in every 6 people diagnosed with cancer has had a different type of cancer in the past.