Does colon cancer run in families?

Will I get colon cancer if my father had it?

If you have familial risk, a single first degree family member (parent or sibling) with colon or endometrial cancer under age 50, your lifetime risk increases to 10-20%. Family history is an important indicator not only because of shared genes, but similar lifestyles too.

What percent of colon cancer is hereditary?

Approximately 5 to 10 percent of colon cancer is hereditary. The major hereditary colon cancer syndromes are Lynch syndrome (previously known as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer or HNPCC) and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). Other genes have also been implicated in hereditary colon cancer risk.

Who gets colon cancer the most?

The risk of colorectal cancer increases as people get older. Colorectal cancer can occur in young adults and teenagers, but the majority of colorectal cancers occur in people older than 50. For colon cancer, the average age at the time of diagnosis for men is 68 and for women is 72.

What are the odds of getting colon cancer?

Overall, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is: about 1 in 23 (4.3%) for men and 1 in 25 (4.0%) for women. A number of other factors (described in Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors) can also affect your risk for developing colorectal cancer.

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When should you get a colonoscopy if colon cancer runs in your family?

Individuals with a family history of one or more first-degree relatives (sibling, parent or child) with sporadic colorectal cancer, regardless of age, should undergo colonoscopy beginning at age 40 years or ten years younger than the age of the affected relative at time of diagnosis, whichever is earlier.

How often should I have a colonoscopy if my mother had colon cancer?

Those with an average risk of colon cancer, should begin screenings at age 50 and repeat once every 10 years. People with a family member who has had cancer should begin colonoscopies at age 40, or 10 years prior to the youngest diagnosed age (whichever comes first) and should repeat every five years.

What are the signs of colon cancer in a woman?

Symptoms

  • A persistent change in your bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation or a change in the consistency of your stool.
  • Rectal bleeding or blood in your stool.
  • Persistent abdominal discomfort, such as cramps, gas or pain.
  • A feeling that your bowel doesn’t empty completely.
  • Weakness or fatigue.

What happens if they find cancer during a colonoscopy?

Usually if a suspected colorectal cancer is found by any screening or diagnostic test, it is biopsied during a colonoscopy. In a biopsy, the doctor removes a small piece of tissue with a special instrument passed through the scope. Less often, part of the colon may need to be surgically removed to make the diagnosis.