Is carcinoma in situ rare?

Does carcinoma in situ mean cancer?

Carcinoma in situ, also called in situ cancer, is different from invasive carcinoma, which has spread to surrounding tissue, and from metastatic carcinoma, which has spread throughout the body to other tissues and organs. In general, carcinoma in situ is the earliest form of cancer, and is considered stage 0.

Should situ carcinoma be left untreated?

Why should DCIS be treated? The cells in DCIS are cancer cells. If left untreated, they may spread out of the milk duct into the breast tissue. If this happens, DCIS has become invasive (or infiltrating) cancer, which in turn can spread to lymph nodes or to other parts of the body.

How is carcinoma in situ treated?

Treatment of DCIS has a high likelihood of success, in most instances removing the tumor and preventing any recurrence. In most people, treatment options for DCIS include: Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) and radiation therapy. Breast-removing surgery (mastectomy)

What does carcinoma in situ mean?

Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is a group of abnormal cells that are found only in the place where they first formed in the body (see left panel). These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread to nearby normal tissue (see right panel).

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What is the difference between carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma?

In situ breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS) is a cancer that starts in a milk duct and has not grown into the rest of the breast tissue. The term invasive (or infiltrating) breast cancer is used to describe any type of breast cancer that has spread (invaded) into the surrounding breast tissue.

How common is carcinoma in situ cervix?

The mean age at diagnosis is 35–37 years,6,7 and the current incidence rate is approximately 6.6 per 100,000 persons, increasing to 11.2 per 100,000 persons at the peak age of 30–39 years. The average interval between a diagnosis of clinically detectable AIS and early invasive cancer is at least 5 years.

How often does DCIS come back?

Most recurrences happen within the 5 to 10 years after initial diagnosis. The chances of a recurrence are under 30%. Women who have breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) for DCIS without radiation therapy have about a 25% to 30% chance of having a recurrence at some point in the future.

How fast does ductal carcinoma in situ grow?

It assumes that all breast carcinomas begin as DCIS and take 9 years to go from a single cell to an invasive lesion for the slowest growing lesions, 6 years for intermediate growing DCIS lesions, and 3 years for fast-growing DCIS lesions.

Is breast carcinoma in situ malignant?

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) means the cells that line the milk ducts of the breast have become cancer, but they have not spread into surrounding breast tissue. DCIS is considered non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer.

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Should I have a mastectomy for DCIS?

If the DCIS is large, a mastectomy may be recommended. Removing the opposite breast usually isn’t recommended; chemotherapy usually isn’t recommended either. Hormonal therapy may be recommended if the DCIS is hormone-receptor-positive. DCIS is NOT invasive cancer.

What stage is high grade DCIS?

DCIS that is high grade, is nuclear grade 3, or has a high mitotic rate is more likely to come back (recur) after it is removed with surgery. DCIS that is low grade, is nuclear grade 1, or has a low mitotic rate is less likely to come back after surgery.