Is there a testicular cancer gene?

What is the main cause of testicular cancer?

Having undescended testicles (cryptorchidism) increases the risk of testicular cancer. This is the most important risk factor for this cancer. In the womb, the testicles develop in a male baby’s abdomen. They usually move down into the scrotum at birth or in the first year of life.

Is testicular cancer genetic to female?

A clinical phenotype for familial testicular cancer has not yet been established for male and female relatives; therefore, we do not yet know whether any other types of male or female cancers, altered fertility or physical stigmata are associated with inheriting a susceptibility to testicular cancer.

Can a girl get testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer can happen in one or both testicles, and can affect people of any age. If it’s caught early, testicular cancer is treatable and usually curable.

Is seminoma hereditary?

Families display a mild phenotype: the most common number of affected families is 2. Age at diagnosis is 2–3 years younger for familial versus sporadic cases. The ratio of familial seminoma to nonseminoma is 1.0.

What are 5 warning signs of testicular cancer?

Five Common Signs of Testicular Cancer

  • A painless lump, swelling or enlargement of one or both testes.
  • Pain or heaviness in the scrotum.
  • A dull ache or pressure in the groin, abdomen or low back.
  • A general feeling of malaise, including unexplained fatigue, fever, sweating, coughing, shortness of breath or mild chest pains.
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How long can you live with untreated testicular cancer?

The general 5-year survival rate for men with testicular cancer is 95%. This means that 95 men out of every 100 men diagnosed with testicular cancer will live at least 5 years after diagnosis. The survival rate is higher for people diagnosed with early-stage cancer and lower for those with later-stage cancer.

Does testicular cancer skip a generation?

While there is not a specific gene linked to testicular cancer, the disease is highly heritable and can be passed from generation to generation. In addition, the average age at diagnosis is two to three years younger than the general population if a first-degree relative has testicular cancer.

Who is most likely to get testicular cancer?

Testis cancer is most common in men in their late 20s and early 30s, with an average age of diagnosis of 33 years old. In fact, testis cancer is the most common malignancy among men 20 to 40 years old.

How can you tell if you got testicular cancer?

The signs and symptoms for testicular cancer include:

  • Painless lump or swelling in either testicle (most common)
  • Dull ache in the lower abdomen or the groin.
  • Sudden build-up of swelling in the scrotum.
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or in the scrotum.
  • Back pain.

Which testicular cancer is most common?

The most common type of testis cancer is a germ cell tumor. There are two main types of GCT: seminoma and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT). Both seminoma and NSGCT occur at about the same rate, and men can have seminoma, NSGCT or a combination of both.

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