What are the side effects of Stage 1 cancer?

How long can you live with Stage 1 cancer?

Stage 1 patients with grade 1 tumors have a 5-year survival of over 90%, as do patients in stages 1A and 1B. Survival rates are often based on studies of large numbers of people, but they can’t predict what will happen in any particular person’s case.

Does Stage 1 cancer have symptoms?

What are the symptoms for stage 1 lung cancer? In stage 1 lung cancer, people usually do not experience symptoms. When they do, the most common symptoms include shortness of breath, a persistent cough, and coughing up blood or blood-stained phlegm.

Can you live with Stage 1 cancer?

Stage 1. Most women (around 98%) will survive their cancer for 5 years or more after diagnosis.

How fast does pancreatic cancer go from Stage 1 to Stage 4?

We estimate that the average T1-stage pancreatic cancer progresses to T4 stage in just over 1 year.

Does Stage 1 cancer need chemo?

Chemotherapy is usually not part of the treatment regimen for earlier stages of cancer. Stage 1 is highly treatable, however, it does require treatment, typically surgery and often radiation, or a combination of the two.

Is stage 1 or 2 cancer worse?

Stage 1 – Localized cancer that has spread into nearby tissues. It has not yet spread to lymph nodes or other areas. Stage 2 – Cancer has spread to a regional area or into nearby tissues or lymph nodes. Stage 3 – More advanced regional spread than Stage 2.

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Is Stage 1 cancer curable?

Stage I is also called early-stage lung cancer. It often can be cured, and most people can expect to live 5 years or longer.

Can you have cancer and feel fine?

Cancer is always a painful disease, so if you feel fine, you don’t have cancer. Many types of cancer cause little to no pain, especially in the early stages.

What are the 7 warning signs of cancer?

These are potential cancer symptoms:

  • Change in bowel or bladder habits.
  • A sore that does not heal.
  • Unusual bleeding or discharge.
  • Thickening or lump in the breast or elsewhere.
  • Indigestion or difficulty in swallowing.
  • Obvious change in a wart or mole.
  • Nagging cough or hoarseness.