What is IDC breast cancer?

Where does IDC spread to?

IDC starts in the cells that line a milk duct in the breast. From there, the cancer breaks through the wall of the duct, and grows into the nearby breast tissues. At this point, it may be able to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymph system and bloodstream.

How long does it take for invasive ductal carcinoma to spread?

According to the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center, breast cancer cells need to divide at least 30 times before they are detectable by physical exam. Each division takes about 1 to 2 months, so a detectable tumor has likely been growing in the body for 2 to 5 years.

Is mastectomy necessary for invasive ductal carcinoma?

In most DCIS cases requiring mastectomy, simple or total mastectomy (removal of breast tissue but no lymph nodes) is performed. Radiation is usually not necessary after mastectomy for DCIS. Some situations in which doctors might recommend mastectomy for DCIS: There is a large area of DCIS.

What chemo is used for invasive ductal carcinoma?

Chemotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma

There are many different chemotherapy drugs to treat ICD such as paclitaxel (Taxol) and doxorubicin (Adriamycin). Talk to your doctor about what’s right for you. Hormonal therapy is used to treat cancer cells with receptors for estrogen or progesterone, or both.

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Which is worse lobular or ductal carcinoma?

An analysis of the largest recorded cohort of patients with invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) demonstrates that outcomes are significantly worse when compared with invasive ductal breast cancer (IDC), highlighting a significant need for more research and clinical trials on patients with ILC.

Can you feel invasive ductal carcinoma?

The tumor usually shows up on a mammogram and it does not always feel like a lump; rather it can feel like a spongy change of breast tissue.

How serious is ductal carcinoma?

DCIS isn’t life-threatening, but having DCIS can increase the risk of developing an invasive breast cancer later on. When you have had DCIS, you are at higher risk for the cancer coming back or for developing a new breast cancer than a person who has never had breast cancer before.