Do uterine polyps need to be removed after menopause?

Why should uterine polyps be removed after menopause?

Removal of endometrial polyps in postmenopausal symptomatic (bleeding, pain, vaginal discharge) women is the standard of care, same goes for asymptomatic women with risk factors (e.g., hypertension, history of breast, ovary, endometrial or colon cancer, Tamoxifen or estrogen treatment, over-weight, no ovulation, …

How common are uterine polyps after menopause?

Uterine polyps are very common. Up to 3 in 10 people may have them at some point in their lives (3, 4), but fewer than 1 in 100 people develop polyps before age 30 (3, 5). They occur most commonly leading up to and after menopause (6). Small polyps may cause no symptoms at all and can go away on their own (2, 7).

What causes polyps in uterus after menopause?

The exact reason that polyps form is unknown, but swings in hormone levels may be a factor. Estrogen, which plays a role in causing the endometrium to thicken each month, also appears to be linked to the growth of uterine polyps.

Should I worry about uterine polyps?

ANSWER: It is rare for uterine polyps to be cancerous. If they aren’t causing problems, monitoring the polyps over time is a reasonable approach. If you develop symptoms, such as abnormal bleeding, however, then the polyps should be removed and evaluated to confirm that there is no evidence of cancer.

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What is the treatment for cancerous uterine polyps?

Instead of making a cut in your belly, they can insert a curette or other surgical tools through your vagina and cervix to take the polyps out. If your polyps have cancer cells, you may need surgery to take out your entire uterus, called a hysterectomy.

What percentage of uterine polyps are cancerous?

Conclusions: The risk of endometrial cancer in women with endometrial polyps is 1.3%, while cancers confined to a polyp were found in only 0.3%. The risk is greatest in postmenopausal women with vaginal bleeding.

Do uterine polyps grow quickly?

After a period, the lining grows rapidly under the influence of hormones like estrogen. Polyps are areas that grow a little too much. As they grow, they usually fan out but remain attached to a small stalk, kind of similar to a bush or a tree.

Do polyps cause weight gain?

So far, there is still no scientific evidence that proves uterine polyps can cause weight gain. But since it makes your lower abdomen swell, it can give the appearance that you’re getting fat. Hence the misconception that uterine polyps can cause women to gain weight.

Can you feel uterine polyps?

Typically, polyps grow to be a few millimeters to a few centimeters. Pedunculated polyps are more common than sessile and can protrude from the uterus into the vagina. Women will typically only feel pain from uterine polyps when this happens.