Is vulvar melanoma dangerous?

·

Is vulvar melanoma deadly?

Genital melanoma is a rare but deadly cancer in women and the prognosis is often poor.

Can you survive vulvar melanoma?

In the United States, women with vulvar melanoma had a median survival of 61 months, with a 60% adjusted (for expected mortality) survival rate at 5 years and a 50% rate at 10 years.

What is the survival rate of vulvar melanoma?

The mean overall survival for vulvar melanomas was 45.9±4 months and the 5-year overall survival rate was 78.6%. The only factor with prognostic significance regarding local recurrence of vulvar melanoma was tumor size (P = 0.003).

Where does vulvar melanoma spread to?

In vulvar melanoma, metastases are most commonly found in the inguinal lymphatic nodes (Table I). Other reported metastatic sites are the lungs, vagina, liver and brain [13, 19].

Can vulvar melanoma be cured?

Vulvar melanoma starts on the skin of the vulva. A partial vulvectomy (surgery to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue around it), along with lymph node removal is the usual treatment for melanoma on the vulva. In some cases, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and/or immunotherapy may also be used.

How fast does vulvar melanoma grow?

Most of these cancers grow slowly, remaining on the surface for years. However, some (for example, melanomas) grow quickly. Untreated, vulvar cancer can eventually invade the vagina, the urethra, or the anus and spread into lymph nodes in the pelvis and abdomen and into the bloodstream.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Can a colposcopy biopsy miss cancer?

What does melanoma on the leg look like?

Border that is irregular: The edges are often ragged, notched, or blurred in outline. The pigment may spread into the surrounding skin. Color that is uneven: Shades of black, brown, and tan may be present. Areas of white, gray, red, pink, or blue may also be seen.

Can I get melanoma on my vagina?

Vaginal melanoma is a rare cancer. It develops from the cells in the skin that produce pigment, which gives the skin its colour. It usually develops in the lower third of the vagina and mostly in women in their 50s.

What does a vulvar lesion look like?

Ultimately, many women will develop a visible vulvar mass: the squamous cell subtype can look like elevated white, pink, or red bumps, while vulvar melanoma characteristically presents as a colored, ulcerated growth.