What happens at first oncology appointment for breast cancer?

What happens at your first oncology appointment?

At the first appointment, the oncologist will talk about treatment options. The doctor will explain which ones are available, how effective they are and what the side effects may be. Then the oncologist will recommend a course and talk about when the treatments should take place.

How long does an initial oncology appointment take?

Treatment lengths vary from patient to patient. Some treatments may last 30 minutes, while others may last as long as eight hours.

What does an oncologist do for breast cancer?

A medical oncologist will treat your cancer with chemotherapy, hormone therapy, targeted therapy, or immunotherapy. A radiation oncologist will treat your cancer with radiation therapy. A surgical oncologist uses surgery to remove tumors.

How do I prepare for my first oncology appointment?

What to Bring to Your First Oncology Appointment

  1. Medications. Please bring a list or a bag of all the prescription medications you are taking. …
  2. Personal and family history. Be prepared to discuss your prior medical history with your physician. …
  3. Insurance and I.D. cards. …
  4. Referring physician information. …
  5. Medical records.
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What questions should I ask at my first oncology appointment?

Here’s what to ask during your first cancer-related visit with your oncologist:

  • What is the purpose of this appointment?
  • Which type of cancer do I have?
  • What are the standard treatments for my condition?
  • Why do you recommend this particular treatment?
  • What are potential hazards and side effects?

When do you see an oncologist?

You will likely be referred to an oncologist if your doctor suspects that you have the disease. Your primary care physician may carry out tests to determine if you might have cancer. If there are any signs of cancer, your doctor may recommend visiting an oncologist as soon as possible.

Do oncologists lie about prognosis?

Many have fulminated against oncologists who lie to patients about their prognoses, but sometimes cancer doctors lie for or with patients to improve our chances of survival.

How many rounds of chemo are normal?

During a course of treatment, you usually have around 4 to 8 cycles of treatment. A cycle is the time between one round of treatment until the start of the next. After each round of treatment you have a break, to allow your body to recover.

How long do you see an oncologist after breast cancer?

Once your initial breast cancer treatment ends, you will need to see your oncologist every three or four months during the first two or three years. Then, you can visit your doctor once or twice a year. After that, these visits will depend on the type of cancer you have had.

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Do all breast cancer patients see an oncologist?

85.8% of the women saw a medical oncologist in addition to a surgeon. 71.9% of the women saw a radiation oncologist in addition to a surgeon. 66% of the women saw all three types of doctors.

What can I expect at my breast cancer consultation?

The surgeon will meet with you and discuss your concerns, medical history, breast history, and family history. Then the doctor will step out ask you to change into a gown for the breast exam. The breast exam may or may not include an ultrasound of the breast at that time.

What questions should I ask an oncologist?

7 Key Questions to Ask Your Oncologist

  • Where and when do you recommend getting a second opinion? …
  • What can I do to preserve my fertility? …
  • Is a clinical trial right for me? …
  • What should I do if I’m simply having trouble coming to grips with my diagnosis? …
  • What is the goal of my treatment? …
  • What will my treatment cost?

What questions should I ask my oncologist about chemo?

Questions to Ask About Chemotherapy

  • Which chemo drugs will I be given?
  • How will the drugs be given to me?
  • How often will I need to get chemo?
  • How long will my treatments last?
  • Where will I get chemo?
  • What’s the goal of chemo for my cancer?
  • What are the chances that the chemo will work?