Tag Archives: mission

And the 2017 Total is…

Congratulations and thank you to everyone who supported the 2017 MSABC of SL! You have made a great impact on the American Cancer Society’s breast cancer mission. This year’s event also shows that it’s worth taking a risk on new ideas and trying new things.

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2017 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer in Second Life Award Winners

Thank you to everyone who supported Making Strides Against Breast Cancer in Second Life for the 2017 season.

This year we would like to honor the following people for going above and beyond as well as those who exemplify the spirit of Making Strides. For more information about the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer in Second Life awards, visit here.

 

Striders Awards: recognizes the walkers who participated in the 2017 Strides Walk.
Gold Striders Award – 40 + strides made
Prettykitty Gumbo
Sidondie Carlberg

Silver Striders Award – 21 to 40 strides made
Henrietta Demina
Tahisha Fairplay
Leala Spire
Thalia Lupindo

Bronze Striders Award – 1 to 20 strides made
Sarandel Llewellyn
Cuddly Waffle
LittleAbs Resident
Sandie Loxingly
Stevie Basevi
Sasha Fairywren
Gem Sunkiller
NinaSofia Constantine
Sun Mellison
Rheata Resident

Friends of Strides Award: This award is awarded to individuals throughout the Second Life community, who have contributed to the Making Strides season in Second Life in various ways. Eligibility: Non 2017 Strides Committee Member and starting on October 1, 2017.

Sanctuary RP & The Heights RP Communities
Pierce Studios
Amethyst Starostin
Gorean Community
Foundation for Life team
SKYY Games
Jamie Brokken
Noel Snowpaw

Making Strides Awareness Award: This award is awarded to the individual who has spread the concept, message, and mission of Making Strides in Second Life the most. Eligibility: Non 2017 Strides Committee Member and starting on October 1, 2017.

Dancers and troupes that were involved in the 2017 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer show
Phoenix Dance troupe
Amethyst Starostin
Zach Starostin (zachbrig)
Fukuju Amaterasu
Tray Porthos
Nadi (Nara Zsun)
Sebastain Bourne

Elysium Cabaret
Corroded Battery (DJ)
Kyshra Rhiadra
Lina (melina Aurotharius)

Winds of Sahara
Winnie Kicks Cancer’s Ass (winniefred)
Antonio (Murhdur)
вєєвѕ carfıєld (BB Schmooz)
Jo(JMB Balogh)
яeđ Qυєeи (Queenie Acacia)

Mynx Dance Academy
Kysersozee Mynx
Taema Mynx (Taema)
Mιηту (Mint Knipper)

Margery Gould Rath Award: This award is named after the founder of the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer movement. The award is awarded to the individual who embraces the concept, spirit, and message of Making Strides with humility, care, and dedication. Eligibility: Non 2017 Strides Committee Member and starting on October 1, 2017.

Trader1 Whiplash and the staff of T1 Radio

Certificate of Appreciation for Committee:
PrettyKitty Gumbo
Serina Juran
Stevie Basevi
Sunshine Zhangsun
Emma Rose Shaw (inanna.andel)
Ray Lobo (nevar.lobo)
Sandie Slate (Sandie Loxingly)
Leala Spire-Marchant (Leala Spire)

Certificate of Sponsorship:
Santuary Role Play Community – Stevie Basevi
The Heights Role Play Community – Stevie Basevi
Fire Within – Amethyst Starostin
An Lema – AelKennyr Rhiano
Saga – Christel Morane
The Reckless Angel – SavannahRaye
Gidget’s – Gidget Hollow

Springboard Beyond Cancer

Springboard Beyond Cancer is a joint venture between the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society to help you Manage Cancer- Your Way.

Take control of your health and manage the challenges of cancer through self-management. Self-management is all of the actions you take to deal with problems and prevent new ones.

  • Learn to advocate for yourself and navigate cancer’s challenges with self-management.
  • Explore the Symptoms section for information on fatigue, nausea, and more physical side-effects of cancer.
  • Understand your rights in the workplace.
  • Understand the importance of taking care of yourself while being there for your loved one.

Create an action deck to collect information related to a cancer topic or treatment.

To learn more, visit Springboard Beyond Cancer today.

Fact Friday: Men & Breast Cancer

Guys, did you know that you can get breast cancer too? Just like other forms of cancer, breast cancer is non-discriminatory.

The American Cancer Society estimates for breast cancer in men in the United States for 2017 are:

About 2,470 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed
About 460 men will die from breast cancer

Breast cancer is about 100 times less common among men than among women. For men, the lifetime risk of getting breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000. The number of breast cancer cases in men relative to the population has been fairly stable over the last 30 years. (Source here.)

Early detection improves the chances that male breast cancer can be treated successfully.

There are many similarities between breast cancer in men and women, but there are some important differences that affect finding it early. These include:

  • Breast size
  • Lack of awareness that men can get breast cancer
  • For men who are high risk careful breast exams might be used
  • Genetic counseling and testing

To learn more about early detection for male breast cancer, please visit Cancer.org here.

What’s New in Research and Treatment in Breast Cancer in Men?
Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits that alter breast cancer risk. Ongoing studies are looking at the effect of exercise, weight gain or loss, and diet on breast cancer risk.
Studies on the best use of genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations continue at a rapid pace. Some studies have found that men with mutations in these genes may be more likely to develop some other cancers, including prostate cancer, stomach cancer, pancreas cancer, and melanoma. The risks for these cancers will be further defined in future studies.

  • New laboratory tests
  • Circulating tumor cells

Researchers have found that in many breast cancers, cells may break away from the tumor and enter the blood. These circulating tumor cells can be detected with sensitive lab tests. Although these tests are available for general use, it isn’t yet clear how helpful they are.

Treatments include:
* Radiation
* Chemotherapy
* Targeted therapies

To learn more about new research developments in the fight against male breast cancer, please visit this page at Cancer.org.

Ways To Help Wednesday: The ACS CHANGE Program

The NFL, its clubs, players and the NFL Players Association are proud to support the fight against breast cancer. Our campaign, “A Crucial Catch”, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, is focused on the importance of annual screenings, especially for women who are 40 and older. Throughout October, NFL games will feature players, coaches and referees wearing pink game apparel, on-field pink ribbon stencils, special game balls and pink coins – all to help raise awareness for this important campaign. All apparel worn at games by players and coaches, along with special game balls and pink coins will be auctioned off at NFL Auction, with proceeds benefiting the American Cancer Society’s Community Health Advocates National Grants for Empowerment (CHANGE) program.

The American Cancer Society’s Community Health Advocates implementing Nationwide Grants for Empowerment and Equity (CHANGE) Grant Program builds community and system capacity to promote health equity, access and navigation to screening resources within underserved communities.

CHANGE grants serve as a catalyst for partners to implement and sustain interventions to effectively engage and mobilize patients; and implement systems and policies that are essential to increasing access to timely cancer screenings.

The Society has awarded nearly 350 grants since 2011 and grant recipients are making amazing impact! Our grant recipients represent community health centers, community-based organizations, academic medical centers, breast and cervical cancer early detection programs, Indian Health Service health centers and faith-based organizations. Learn more about how these CHANGE grants are impacting communities here.

New in 2017 the NFL and the American Cancer Society have expanded the Crucial Catch program to include early detection and risk reduction efforts for other cancers to increase the impact of the campaign. Read the full press release here.

As part of the campaign, the NFL and ACS launched a new, digital tool, The Defender, which provides the public with free personalized tips to reduce their cancer risk. In the spirit of ‘The Best Defense is a Good Offense,’ people can enter information about their height, weight, exercise regimen and more. The tool will analyze and provides personalized recommendations on what they can do to reduce their risk of getting cancer. The Defender was funded by the NFL and developed by ACS and can be found at TheDefender.cancer.org.

You can take part in the Crucial Catch initiative by bidding on authentic game-worn NFL Crucial Catch products, to learn more or place your bid visit the NFL Crucial Catch page here.

Schools and leagues are also invited to join the fight as part of the Crucial Catch with the Coaches vs. Cancer program. To sign up or learn more, visit here.

 

Mission Monday: Mammograms- Before, During and After Screening

The biggest key to fighting breast cancer is early diagnosis. Along with your monthly self-exam, most women should schedule an annual mammogram.

Breast cancers found during screening exams are more likely to be smaller and still confined to the breast. The size of a breast cancer and how far it has spread are some of the most important factors in predicting the prognosis of a woman with this disease.

For women with an average risk of breast cancer the American Cancer Society recommends this screening schedule:

Women between 40 and 44 have the option to start screening with a mammogram every year.

Women 45 to 54 should get mammograms every year.

Women 55 and older can switch to a mammogram every other year, or they can choose to continue yearly mammograms. Screening should continue as long as a woman is in good health and is expected to live 10 more years or longer.

All women should understand what to expect when getting a mammogram for breast cancer screening – what the test can and cannot do.

Women who are at high risk for breast cancer based on certain factors should get an MRI and a mammogram every year, typically starting at age 30. This includes women who:

  • Have a lifetime risk of breast cancer of about 20% to 25% or greater, according to risk assessment tools that are based mainly on family history (see below)
  • Have a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation (based on having had genetic testing)
  • Have a first-degree relative (parent, brother, sister, or child) with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, and have not had genetic testing themselves
  • Had radiation therapy to the chest when they were between the ages of 10 and 30 years
  • Have Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, or Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, or have first-degree relatives with one of these syndromes

Once you have had your mammogram, what happens next?

Usually following a mammogram you will get a letter with your results within 30 days that everything was normal.

But if doctors find something suspicious, they’ll call you back – usually within just 5 days – to take new pictures or get other tests.

Getting that call can be scary, but a suspicious finding does not mean you have cancer.

A suspicious finding may be just dense breast tissue, a cyst, or even a tumor that isn’t cancer. Other times, the image just isn’t clear and needs to be retaken. Or, if this is your first mammogram, your doctor may want to look at an area more closely simply because there is no previous mammogram to compare it with.

You will likely have another follow-up mammogram, a diagnostic mammogram. You may also have an ultrasound of your breast or possibly an MRI.

Following one of these tests you are likely to be told 1 of the following:

* The suspicious area turned out to be nothing to worry about and you can return to your regular mammogram schedule.

* The area is probably nothing to worry about, but you should have your next mammogram sooner than normal – usually in 4 to 6 months – to make sure it doesn’t change over time.

* Cancer was not ruled out and a biopsy is needed to tell for sure.
– Even if you need a breast biopsy, it still doesn’t mean you have cancer. Most biopsy results are not cancer, but a biopsy is the only way to find out. During the procedure, a small amount of tissue is removed and looked at under a microscope.

If you do have cancer and you are referred to a breast specialist, use these tips to make your appointment as useful as possible:

* Make a list of questions to ask at the appointment. Download a list from the American Cancer Society or call us at 1-800-227-2345.

* Bring a family member or friend with you. They can serve as an extra pair of ears, help you remember things later, and give you support.

* Ask if you can record important conversations.

* Take notes. If someone uses a word you don’t know, ask them to spell it and explain it.

* Ask the doctors or nurses to explain anything you don’t understand.

How can I stay calm while waiting?

Waiting for appointments and the results of tests can be frightening. Many women experience strong emotions including disbelief, anxiety, fear, anger, and sadness during this time. Some things to remember:

* It’s normal to have these feelings.

* Most breast changes are not cancer and are not life-threatening.

* Talking with a loved one or a counselor about your feelings may help.

* Talking with other women who have been through a breast biopsy may help.

* The American Cancer Society is available at 1-800-227-2345 around the clock to answer your questions and provide support.

For more on mammograms and the importance of early detection, visit Cancer.org here.

Learn more about non-cancerous breast conditions here.

Guidelines for what to do if you are called back after a mammogram, visit here.

Fact Friday: FDA Approves Verzenio (Abemaciclib) for Certain Advanced Breast Cancers

As we near the end of this year’s MSABC campaign, We are pleased to inform you that another step has been made toward our end goal!

On September 17, 2017 it was released that the FDA had approved Verzenio (Abemaciclib) for the treatment of certain advanced breast cancers.

To learn more about Verzenio (Abemaciclib) and what types of advanced cancers it can be used for, please see the official release here.

This is why we continue to Make Strides with your support!